Hydrocodone, Chlorpheniramine, Pseudoephedrine

Drug Class: Hydrocodone, Chlorpheniramine, Pseudoephedrine > Hydrocodone > Semi Synthetic Opioid > Opioids > Opioid Agonist > Analgesic.

Uses

Doctors prescribe hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine to patients to relieve symptoms associated with the common cold, allergies and upper respiratory infections. These symptoms include cough, sneezing, runny nose and itchy, watery eyes. Physicians use hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine preparations because this single-dose combination medication relieves a wide variety of symptoms. Patients use this medication to help them get the rest they need, attend class or go to work without suffering troublesome symptoms. Learn More About Hydrocodone, Chlorpheniramine and Pseudoephedrine Uses

Administration/Dosage

Hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine is available in regular-release capsules or liquid, or as an extended-release oral suspension. Hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine capsules are available in strengths of 2 mg chlorpheniramine, 5 mg of hydrocodone and 30 mg of pseudoephedrine. The typical dose for adults and children 12 years and older is one to two capsules orally every 8 hours. Strengths and dosages differ between various liquid preparations of hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine. Strengths range from 2 mg to 4 mg of chlorpheniramine, from 1.67 mg to 5 mg of hydrocodone and 17.5 mg to 40 mg of pseudoephedrine in every 5 ml of liquid or syrup.

Hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine may cause excitability in children. Do not administer hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine to children under the age of six years; researchers have not yet established safety and efficacy for patients in this age group.

Elderly patients are more sensitive to the effects of hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine. Healthcare providers should monitor older patients, especially during the initial doses.

If you miss a scheduled dose, take the missed dose as soon as you can, provided it is not nearly time to take another one. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time to take another and you can tolerate the symptoms. Do not take more than one dose in an effort to catch up.

Take hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine exactly as prescribed. Consult with the prescribing physician if your symptoms do not go away after five to seven days. Do not take more than the recommended dose or use hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine longer than prescribed.

Hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine may cause you to sunburn more easily. Avoid prolonged exposure to the sun, tanning booths or sunlamps. Use sunscreen or wear protective clothing if you plan to be in the sun for any length of time.

Hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine may interfere with allergen skin testing. Inform the ordering physician and reception scheduling your allergen testing that you have used hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine. They may instruct you to discontinue hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine a few days before the test.

Tell your dentist or surgeon that you are taking this medication before having dental work, emergency procedures or an operation.

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Action

Hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine preparations include a cough suppressant, decongestant and antihistamine to relieve the wide variety of symptoms associated with a cold, allergy flare-up or respiratory infection. A respiratory infection refers to any number of illnesses affecting the nose, throat, pharynx or larynx caused by bacteria and viruses such as influenza and strep. When irritants, such as bacteria, viruses and allergens enter the respiratory tract, the body responds with various defensive actions, such as coughing, sneezing and congestion. While these defensive actions help your body ward off serious viruses and bacteria, the symptoms they produce can be annoying. Hydrocodone is a narcotic cough suppressant. When something irritates your respiratory tract, your nervous system sends a request to the brain for a cough forceful enough to propel the irritant out of your body. Hydrocodone works directly on the part of the brain responsible for the cough reflex, making the brain unaware of the need to cough. Foreign irritants trigger the release of histamines in your body, resulting in a runny nose and itchy, watery eyes. Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine, which means it reduces the level of histamines in your system to provide relief from symptoms. Pseudoephedrine is a decongestant that opens nasal passageways by shrinking blood vessels in the tissue lining your nose. More About How Hydrocodone, Chlorpheniramine and Pseudoephedrine Works

Precautions

An allergic reaction is a serious, potentially fatal, medical emergency. Seek help immediately if you notice any symptoms of an allergic reaction. Symptoms of an allergic reaction include difficulty breathing, hives and swelling of the face, lips, tongue or throat.

You may not be able to take this medication if you have a history of certain medical conditions. Hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine can worsen these disorders or interfere with treatment, or the disease may change the way this medication works for you.

Tell your physician about any significant illnesses or conditions, including:

  • High Blood Pressure.
  • Diabetes.
  • Stroke.
  • Glaucoma.
  • Blockage of the Bladder, Stomach or Intestines.
  • Ulcers.
  • Trouble Urinating.
  • Prostate Problems.
  • Overactive Thyroid
  • History of Asthma.
  • Chronic Cough.
  • Lung Problems, Especially Chronic Bronchitis or Emphysema.
  • COPD.
  • A Cough with Large Amounts of Mucus.
  • Recent Head or Brain Injury.
  • Brain Tumor.
  • Increased Pressure In the Brain.
  • Infection of the Brain or Nervous System.
  • Epilepsy, or Seizures.
  • Stomach Problems, Ulcers.
  • Bowel Problems, Chronic Inflammation or Ulceration of the Bowel.
  • Gallbladder Problems, Gallstones).
  • Recent Abdominal Surgery.
  • History of Alcohol or Substance Abuse.
  • History of Suicidal Thoughts or Behavior.

Hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine may make you dizzy or drowsy. Use caution when operating heavy machinery or driving a car. Alcohol and other medications may worsen dizziness and drowsiness.

Hydrocodone is habit-forming.

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Warnings

Do not use hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine if you have very high blood pressure, severe heart blood vessel disease, rapid heartbeat or serious heart problems. Do not use hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine if you cannot urinate or if you are having an asthma attack. Using hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine while GHB or an MAO inhibitor is still in your system can cause serious drug interactions; do not take hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine if you have taken GHB or an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days.

Researchers have not yet established if using hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine during pregnancy will cause harm to the unborn child. Tell the prescribing physician if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while taking this medication. Notify your healthcare provider immediately if you become pregnant while using hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine.

Do not stop taking hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine unless directed to do so by a physician. Sudden cessation may cause unpleasant withdrawal symptoms, especially if you have been taking large doses or using hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine for a long time. Try weaning yourself from this opioid by taking successively smaller doses further apart. Contact your doctor or rehabilitation professional if you cannot stop taking hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine.

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Drug Interactions

Hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine can interact with other drugs in unpredictable and unhealthy ways. Give a complete and updated list of all your medications to the prescribing physician and pharmacist filling the order. Include all prescriptions, over-the-counter medicines and herbal remedies. Do not stop, start or change the way you take any medicine without first consulting a doctor.

Beta-blockers such as propranolol, COMT inhibitors such as tolcapone, furazolidone, indomethacin, MAOIs, or tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline may increase the risk of side effects associated with hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine. Taking Cimetidine, digoxin, droxidopa, or sodium oxybate ( GHB) increases the risk of severe drowsiness, breathing problems, seizures, irregular heartbeat, or heart attack associated with hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine. Naltrexone may decrease a hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine preparation's effectiveness. Hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine may increase the risk of side effects of Bromocriptine or hydantoins. Hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine may reduce the effectiveness of Guanadrel, guanethidine, mecamylamine, methyldopa and reserpine. More Drug Interactions

Side effects

Common side effects include:

  • Nausea, Vomiting, Upset Stomach, Constipation.
  • Dry Mouth.
  • Blurred Vision.
  • Dizziness, Drowsiness.
  • Problems with Memory, Concentration.
  • Sleep Problems.
  • Insomnia.
  • Ringing in the Ears.
  • Warmth, Tingling, or Redness under the Skin.
  • Skin Rash or Itching.

Stop using hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine immediately and contact the prescribing physician if you suffer serious side effects.

Serious side effects:

  • Severe Dizziness, Anxiety, Restless Feeling, or Nervousness.
  • Fast, Pounding or Irregular Heartbeats.
  • Shallow Breathing.
  • Slow Heartbeat.
  • Confusion, Hallucinations, Unusual Thoughts or Behavior.
  • Feeling Like You Might Pass Out.
  • Urinating Less Than Usual or Not At All.
  • Easy Bruising or Bleeding.
  • Unusual Weakness.
  • Fever, Chills, Body Aches, Flu Symptoms.
  • Symptoms of Dangerously High Blood Pressure - Severe Headache, Blurred Vision, Buzzing In the Ears, Chest Pain, Shortness Of Breath, Seizure.
  • Upper Abdominal Pain.
  • Itching.
  • Loss of Appetite.
  • Dark Urine.
  • Clay-Colored Stools.
  • Jaundice.

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Overdose

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, deaths from drug overdose tripled since 1990; the CDC now calls the increasing number of deaths due to prescription drug overdose an epidemic. In 2008, more people died from overdoses of prescription opioids than from cocaine and heroin combined. If you suspect you or someone you know has taken a drug overdose, immediately contact poison control center at 1-800-222-1222 or go to the emergency room. Overdose symptoms include:

  • Blurred Vision.
  • Confusion.
  • Hallucinations.
  • Seizures.
  • Severe Dizziness, Lightheadedness or Headache.
  • Severe Drowsiness.
  • Unusually Fast, Slow or Irregular Heartbeat.
  • Vomiting.

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Abuse

A person abuses drugs by taking larger doses than prescribed or by taking a drug without a prescription to get high. Opioids are a favorite among recreational users. Abusers acquire drugs by calling in or presenting phony prescriptions to pharmacies, visiting multiple doctors, buying it on the street or by stealing it from friends, family members and strangers.

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Withdrawal

Withdrawal is a normal, predictable physiological reaction to discontinuing a drug the body has grown dependent upon. Physical dependence and subsequent withdrawal are not necessarily signs of recreational use or willful criminal abuse; a person can become dependent on a drug after taking it as prescribed by a physician. The flu-like withdrawal symptoms vary from person to person and can last for several weeks, depending on the complexity and severity of the individual's dependence. Powerful withdrawal symptoms can prevent some people from quitting drugs without the help of qualified rehabilitative specialists. If your withdrawal symptoms are intolerable, consult with a physician or rehabilitation center.

Detox

Overcoming dependence on drugs is a complex endeavor, frequently requiring the help of highly trained rehabilitation specialists. Rehabilitative treatment programs attend to each facet of the complicated syndrome of drug dependence, including overcoming withdrawal symptoms, removing the drug from your system and addressing any social issues associated with drug dependence. During the initial phase of rehabilitation, physicians administer detoxifying and cleansing medicine to neutralize the opioids in your body while simultaneously easing your withdrawal symptoms. Once stabilized, increase your odds of success by taking part in a counseling program or other social services to address any issues that lead to or is the result of your dependence on drugs. Rapid detox is a humane and very effective way to overcome powerful withdrawal symptoms that prevented you from quitting on your own. Specially trained rapid detox physicians administer anesthesia and sedatives along with detoxification medications. You sleep through the entire withdrawal process, blissfully unaware of uncomfortable withdrawal symptoms. When you awaken, you will have no memory of the withdrawal process. Learn More About Hydrocodone, Chlorpheniramine and Pseudoephedrine Detoxification Programs

Storage

Keep hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine preparations at room temperature, between 59 and 86 degrees Fahrenheit. Store away from excessive heat, moisture and light. Do not keep this medication in the bathroom. Keep away from children and pets. Do not allow adults to mistakenly or purposefully take this medication. To prevent theft, tell only your healthcare providers that you have this medicine in your home. Consult with your pharmacist about the best way to discard hydrocodone, chlorpheniramine and pseudoephedrine when you are done taking it.

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